School Check Results:
Individual Summary

The data below provides a summary of how well you are organizing your resources based on the principles that high-performing schools use to make resource allocation decisions. There is an average score for each resource allocation principle and detailed scores by strategy and by specific practices within each strategy. The blue bars display the number of people who chose each answer by practice and the green check displays your answer by practice. The “Group Results” section on the right displays the other group reports that you can access and if you are a member of more than one group you can change groups to view additional group summary reports.

Assessment
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
20/20 Best Practice
Excellent Teaching for All Students
Personalized Learning and Support
Cost Effectiveness through Creative Solutions

HOW DO I INTERPRET MY RESULTS?

Your results show how your responses compare to “best practice.” Our definition of “best practice” is based on nearly 10 years of work with large urban districts, as well as deep study of the research into what makes high-performing school systems succeed.

You can read more about our vision for urban school system transformation in One Vision, Seven Strategies or in the School System 20/20 section of our website.

These results are not an evaluation of your school—they are the beginning of a strategic conversation. We hope they spark crucial discussions with your colleagues, and point to where more research and data may be needed. Get a detailed report of the questions and your answers by selecting each strategy above.

WHAT'S NEXT?

Learn What Your Peers Think: School Check is most useful when used in a group. For example, an entire school leadership team can take the self-assessment as a part of the yearly school planning process. Each person’s answers are kept private, while the group result is visible to all. Email Kristan Singleton, Director of Tools and Technologies, if you’d like to set up a group.

Get more ideas and tools: Learn more about our vision for strategic school design:

Understand the big picture: Learn more about our vision for transforming school systems through:

Excellent Teaching for All Students

Your Score:
Assessment
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
20/20 Best Practice
Data-Driven Instruction
Teaching Teams
Differentiated Teacher Roles
Individual Professional Growth
Hiring and Strategic Retention

Data-Driven Instruction

1
Common interim assessments are aligned with end-of-year goals (standards) and administered by all same-subject teachers in a grade during a scheduled testing window at least 4-6 times a year.
This happens:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: For some grades and core subjects
  • Level 3:For most grades or core subjects
  • 20/20 Practice: For all grades and core subjects
change
2
Teachers and instructional experts are trained and proficient in using data to adjust instruction.
The proportion of teachers and instructional experts who are trained and proficient in using data to adjust instruction is: :
  • Level 1: Less than 50%
  • Level 2: Between 50% and 75%
  • Level 3: Between 76% and 90%
  • 20/20 Practice: More than 90%
change
3
Teachers work in teams with expert support to plan instruction and other tests “backward” from interim assessments, ensuring that content and skills are taught to the correct level of rigor.
School-wide, the proportion of teaching teams that do this is:
  • Level 1: Less than 50% of teams
  • Level 2: Between 50% and 75% of teams
  • Level 3: Between 76% and 90% of teams
  • 20/20 Practice:More than 90% of teams
change
4
Data from all assessments (formative and interim) is made available in a timely manner (no more than one week between administration of assessment and completion of grading).
Data from assessments, both formative and interim, is made available within one week:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: For some grades and core subjects
  • Level 3:For most grades or core subjects
  • 20/20 Practice: For all grades and core subjects
change
5
Data from common interim assessments is made available in easy-to-use reports, which facilitates question-level analysis.
Data from common interim assessments is made available in this format:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: For some grades and core subjects
  • Level 3:For most grades or core subjects
  • 20/20 Practice: For all grades and core subjects
change
6
Subject teachers in a grade use question-level analysis of common test data, including, but not limited to, data from interim assessments, to regroup students, inform interventions, and adjust instruction.
Question-level analysis of common test data is used for this purpose:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: For some grades and core subjects
  • Level 3:For most grades or core subjects
  • 20/20 Practice: For all grades and core subjects
change
7
The master calendar reflects data priorities, including the schedule for interim assessments, common planning time following interim assessments to adjust plans and make new groups, and dedicated time for re-teaching areas where students are having difficulty.
The master calendar reflects:
  • Level 1: Very few or none of the priorities
  • Level 2: Some of these priorities
  • Level 3: Most of these priorities
  • 20/20 Practice: All of these priorities
change

Teaching Teams

8
Teaching teams use collaborative planning time productively, as evidenced by the use of clear purposes, agendas, and protocols. (Part 1 of 2)
Teaching teams are accountable for accomplishing specific purposes during collaborative planning time:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Mostly
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
9
Teaching teams use collaborative planning time productively, as evidenced by the use of clear purposes, agendas, and protocols. (Part 2 of 2)
Productive collaborative planning time is supported through clear agendas as well as protocols for completing work and/or making decisions:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Mostly
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
10
Teachers participate in shared content teams that collaboratively lesson plan, analyze the results of common assessments, and adjust instruction.
The proportion of teachers that meet with a shared content team to collaboratively lesson plan, analyze the results of common assessments and adjust instruction is:
  • Level 1: Less than 20%
  • Level 2: Between 21% and 50%
  • Level 3: Between 51% and 80%
  • 20/20 Practice: More than 90% of teams
change
11
Members of each teaching team are deliberately assigned in order to combine the knowledge and expertise needed to achieve student learning goals.
School-wide, the proportion of teams that have at least one highly effective teacher AND have the necessary combination of knowledge and expertise is:
  • Level 1: Less than 50%r/li>
  • Level 2: Between 50% and 75% of teams
  • Level 3: Between 76% and 90% of teams
  • 20/20 Practice: More than 90% of teams
change
12
A professional culture that is based on trust, commitment, constructive conflict, shared accountability, and collective goals enables adults to achieve academic results with students.
Professional adult culture is embraces and practice by:
  • Level 1: Very few or none
  • Level 2: A small number of staff
  • Level 3: Most staff
  • 20/20 Practice: All staff
change
13
Highly effective instructional experts facilitate collaborative planning time.
Highly effective instructional experts are available to support:
  • Level 1: Less than 50% of teams
  • Level 2: Between 50% and 75% of teams
  • Level 3: Between 76% and 90% of teams
  • 20/20 Practice: More than 90% of teams
change
14
Instructional experts have sufficient time to organize student data and material to guide discussions. (Part 1 of 2)
The amount of time that instructional experts have to plan for team collaborative meetings is:
  • Level 1: Less than half the length of the meeting
  • Level 2: Less than the length of the meeting
  • Level 3: Between one and two times the meeting's length
  • 20/20 Practice: At least twice the meeting's length
change
15
Instructional experts have sufficient support to prepare for and facilitate effective collaborative planning time. (Part 2 of 2)
Instructional experts:
  • Level 1: Have infrequent opportunities to check in with supervisors and collaborate with other experts
  • Level 2: Have occasional opportunities to check in with supervisors and collaborate with other experts
  • Level 3: Have regular opportunities check in with supervisors and collaborate with other experts
  • 20/20 Practice: Have frequent opportunities to check in with supervisors and collaborate with other experts/li>
change
16
Teams regularly examine a breadth of real-time data on student performance and need in order to adjust instruction and other interventions.
Teams examine multiple measures of student performance, including analysis of student work, during collaborative planning time in order to adjust instruction and other interventions:
  • Level 1: Rarely
  • Level 2: Monthly
  • Level 3: Biweekly
  • 20/20 Practice: Weekly
change
17
Sufficient collaborative planning time is scheduled for teaching teams. (Part 1 of 2)
Shared content teaching teams typically meet to lesson plan and analyze student data:
  • Level 1: No time is regularly scheduled on a weekly basis
  • Level 2: For 60 consecutive minutes or less per week
  • Level 3: Between 60 and 90 consecutive minutes per week
  • 20/20 Practice: For 90 or more consecutive minutes per week
change
18
Sufficient collaborative planning time is scheduled for teaching teams. (Part 2 of 2)
Teaching teams who meet to achieve other purposes (e.g., vertical planning across grades; school culture) typically meet:
  • Level 1: Very infrequently—the team does not achieve its purpose
  • Level 2: Infrequently—the team only partially accomplishes its purpose
  • Level 3: Regularly enough to achieve its purpose
  • Level 4: Systematically
change

Differentiated Teacher Roles

19
Most-effective teachers are assigned to the highest-priority areas (i.e., grades, subjects).
In high-priority areas, the percent of teachers who are effective or highly effective is approximately:
  • Less than 25%
  • 25-50%
  • 50-75%
  • 75-100%
change
20
Teachers are assigned to specialized roles (e.g., departmentalization, specific student types) that maximize their strengths.
Teachers are assigned to specialized roles according to their strengths:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3:Often
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
21
The reach of highly effective teachers is extended through differentiated roles.
Through differentiated roles, highly effective teachers are able to reach:
  • Level 1: Below 20% of students
  • Level 2: 20-59% of students
  • Level 3: 50-79% of students
  • 20/20 Practice: 80% of students
change
22
Differentiated teacher roles include different position descriptions, selection processes, accountability systems, and pay.
Roles for highly effective teachers are differentiated:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
23
Teachers in need of improvement have differentiated roles to reduce their responsibility/reach and support their development.
Struggling teachers have lower student loads and increased support (e.g., co-teaching):
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Often
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change

Individual Professional Growth

24
Continuous growth toward excellent individual and collective practice is a core belief among faculty.
Core belief is shared by the following proportion of school staff:
  • Level 1: Less than 25%
  • Level 2: 25-50%
  • Level 3: 50-75%
  • 20/20 Practice: 75-100%
change
25
Sufficient time is devoted to professional growth. (Part 1 of 3)
All faculty participate in the following number of days for professional development before the start of the school year:
  • Level 1: No days
  • Level 2:1 or 2
  • Level 3:3 to 5
  • 20/20 Practice: 5 or more
change
26
Sufficient time is devoted to professional growth. (Part 2 of 3)
The school year professional development calendar includes the following time for faculty professional development:
  • Level 1: Infrequent meetings
  • Level 2: Monthly faculty or ILT meetings
  • Level 3: 2 to 7 half or full days
  • 20/20 Practice: 8 or more full days
change
27
Sufficient time is devoted to professional growth. (Part 3 of 3)
Formal evaluations and cycles of observation and feedback are provided by the same person:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
28
Teachers receive regular cycles of observation and actionable feedback.
During the academic year, cycles of observation and actionable feedback are provided to each teacher on average:
  • Level 1: One or less
  • Level 2: Three times
  • Level 3: Every month
  • 20/20 Practice: Every month
change
29
Cycles of observation and feedback and formal evaluations are integrated and based on rigorous teacher performance standards, student data, and individual professional growth goals. (Part 1 of 3)
Cycles of observation and feedback and formal evaluations are integrated:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
30
Cycles of observation and feedback and formal evaluations are integrated and based on rigorous teacher performance standards, student data, and individual professional growth goals. (Part 2 of 3)
Rigorous teacher performance standards and student data are used in cycles of observation and feedback and formal evaluations:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
31
Cycles of observation and feedback and formal evaluations are integrated and based on rigorous teacher performance standards, student data, and individual professional growth goals. (Part 3 of 3)
Individual professional growth goals linked to performance standards are collaboratively developed at the start of the school year and used in cycles of observation and feedback and formal evaluations:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
32
School-based professional growth support is differentiated, integrated into multiple environments, and sustained long enough for teachers to demonstrate proficiency. (Part 1 of 3)
Data is used to select topics (target skills or content understanding) for whole-group PD, and to differentiate topic-focused PD for small groups of faculty with similar needs, or individuals:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
33
School-based professional growth support is differentiated, integrated into multiple environments, and sustained long enough for teachers to demonstrate proficiency. (Part 2 of 3)
Topic-focused professional growth support is integrated into and flows through full-group PD, team meetings, and individual observation and coaching:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
34
School-based professional growth support is differentiated, integrated into multiple environments, and sustained long enough for teachers to demonstrate proficiency. (Part 3 of 3)
Topic-focused professional growth support is sustained long enough for teachers to demonstrate proficiency in target skills:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
35
New and struggling teachers get more and targeted support.
New and struggling teachers get more and targeted support:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
36
Instructional experts (administrators and coaches) prioritize professional growth support and improve teacher effectiveness and student outcomes.
Instructional experts spend the following proportion of their school time observing, coaching, and evaluating teachers and preparing for and facilitating data-driven team meetings and professional development:
  • Level 1: Less than 40%
  • Level 2: Between 40% and 59% of teams
  • Level 3: Between 60% and 80% of teams
  • 20/20 Practice: More than 80% of teams
change
37
Instructional experts (administrators and coaches) prioritize professional growth support and improve teacher effectiveness and student outcomes.
Instructional experts participate in regular meetings together to improve their own content knowledge and coaching skills:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change

Hiring and Strategic Retention

38
Hiring priorities reflect key mission fit characteristics and missing instructional and skill gaps in teaching teams. (Part 1 of 2)
New hires share the vision, mission, and core beliefs of the school team:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
39
Hiring priorities reflect key mission fit characteristics and missing instructional and skill gaps in teaching teams. (Part 2 of 2)
New hires fill missing instructional content and skill gaps in teaching teams:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
40
The school vision and assets are defined and marketed to attract great teachers who fit hiring priorities. (Part 1 of 2)
The school vision is inspiring to faculty and the school community:
  • Level 1:Few or none
  • Level 2: Some
  • Level 3: Most
  • 20/20 Practice: All
change
41
The school vision and assets are defined and marketed to attract great teachers who fit hiring priorities. (Part 2 of 2)
School vision and assets are highlighted online and in print materials, and staff attend job fairs and employ other outreach strategies to reach applicants:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
42
Partnerships or internal “pipeline” structures consistently supply effective teachers who fit hiring priorities.
Partnerships or internal structures (i.e., interns, apprenticeship programs) consistently supply effective teachers:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
43
The posting and interview process starts early enough for the school to secure top-quality candidates.
Hiring decisions are made:
  • Level 1: After other area schools-all positions are not filled until after school begins
  • Level 2: After the end of the previous school year, but all positions are filled before the start of the year
  • Level 3: Before the end of the previous school year
  • 20/20 Practice: By mid-spring of the previous school year
change
44
A rigorous interview process includes lesson demonstrations with feedback, teacher interviews focused on content understanding, instructional skills, mission fit, professionalism, and reference checks. (Part 1 of 3)
The interview process includes lesson demonstrations with feedback:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
45
A rigorous interview process includes lesson demonstrations with feedback, teacher interviews focused on content understanding, instructional skills, mission fit, professionalism, and reference checks. (Part 2 of 3)
Interviews include teachers and are focused on content understanding, instructional skills, vision/mission/core beliefs fit, and professionalism:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
46
A rigorous interview process includes lesson demonstrations with feedback, teacher interviews focused on content understanding, instructional skills, mission fit, professionalism, and reference checks. (Part 3 of 3)
The interview process includes reference checks:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
47
High performers are deliberately retained through differentiated roles and greater responsibility, recognition, additional pay, regular feedback, and individual professional growth support. (Part 1 of 4)
High-performing teachers are retained through differentiated roles and responsibility:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
48
High performers are deliberately retained through differentiated roles and greater responsibility, recognition, additional pay, regular feedback, and individual professional growth support. (Part 2 of 4)
High-performing teachers are retained through recognition:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
49
High performers are deliberately retained through differentiated roles and greater responsibility, recognition, additional pay, regular feedback, and individual professional growth support. (Part 3 of 4)
High-performing teachers are retained through additional pay:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
50
High performers are deliberately retained through differentiated roles and greater responsibility, recognition, additional pay, regular feedback, and individual professional growth support. (Part 4 of 4)
High-performing teachers are retained through regular feedback and professional growth support:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
51
Chronically underperforming teachers are efficiently exited through fair evaluation processes.
Teachers who chronically underperform are exited efficiently through fair evaluations:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change

Personalized Learning and Support

Your Score:
Assessment
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
20/20 Best Practice
Targeted and Dynamic Learning Resources
Personal Relationships and School Culture
Targeted SEL
Sufficient Time

Targeted and Dynamic Learning Resources

1
Students spend additional time on subjects in which they are struggling.
Students who are struggling are allocated:
  • Level 1: No additional targeted learning time
  • Level 2: Some additional time in target area
  • Level 3: 50% more time in target area than students who are at proficient levels
  • 20/20 Practice: More than 50% more time in target area than students who are proficient
change
2
Structures exist to provide additional time to students in priority content areas.
Priority content areas are allocated:
  • Level 1: No additional targeted learning time
  • Level 2: Some additional time
  • Level 3: 50% more time than other content areas
  • 20/20 Practice: 50% more time than other content areas
change
3
Group sizes are reduced for high-priority areas (high-priority subjects, transition grades, remedial/support courses).
Group sizes in high-priority content areas are:
  • Level 1: Bigger than average
  • Level 2: Same as average
  • Level 3: Sometimes meaningfully smaller than average
  • 20/20 Practice: Usually or always meaningfully smaller than average
change
4
Teacher loads (total number of students a teacher teaches throughout a week) are lower in subjects that require extensive feedback (writing) and times where students need more individualized attention (courses for students who are struggling).
In areas requiring more individualized attention, teacher loads are:
  • Level 1: 100+ students
  • Level 2: 80–100 students
  • Level 3: 60–80 students
  • 20/20 Practice: Fewer than 60 students
change
5
Technology that advances student learning is integrated as appropriate to enable rapid and efficient adjustments to groupings, time, and program based on student need.
Technology that advances learning is integrated to enable rapid and efficient response to student need:
  • Level 1: Infrequently or not at all
  • Level 2: In some areas, but not utilized to its full potential
  • Level 3: In some areas and used to its full potential
  • 20/20 Practice: Fully, in all or nearly all applicable areas
change
6
Teaching teams review student data to frequently adjust supports.
Data conversations that inform student grouping, student time on task, and ongoing interventions occur:
  • Level 1: Infrequently or not at all
  • Level 2: At least four times a year
  • Level 3: Monthly
  • 20/20 Practice: Biweekly or more often
change
7
Scheduling structures are flexible, allowing teams of teachers to make frequent changes to how much time is spent on what based on student progress.
Scheduling structures are:
  • Level 1: Fixed—changes are made only at year’s end
  • Level 2: Adjusted infrequently
  • Level 3: Adjusted at least four times a year
  • 20/20 Practice: Adjusted frequently based on student progress
change
8
Student groupings vary throughout the year based on student need and teacher expertise (this includes changes to group size, content focus, tech use, and/or assignment to teachers).
In high-priority areas, students are grouped and regrouped
  • Level 1: Infrequently or not at all
  • Level 2: Within some individual teachers’ classrooms (e.g., through the use of centers)
  • Level 3: Within some teams across classrooms
  • 20/20 Practice: In all teams across classrooms
:
change
9
Special education and ELL (specialists) services are integrated into the school’s skill-based grouping strategy and align smoothly with core instruction.
Specialized services are:
  • Level 1: Isolated from core instruction
  • Level 2: Delivered mostly through pullout—however, there is good communication between specialists and regular education teachers on student goals, progress, and interventions.
  • Level 3: Delivered through an inclusion model whenever possible —however, specialists serve students with disabilities or ELLs only
  • 20/20 Practice: Delivered through an inclusion model whenever possible—specialists form skill-based groups that may include general education students
change
10
Students are in learning environments that meet their needs, while maintaining opportunities to learn from peers.
Typical classroom rosters are composed of:
  • Level 1: Students who are mostly at the same proficiency levels, all day
  • Level 2: Students scattered across a wide range of proficiency levels, all day
  • Level 3: Students scattered across a wide range of proficiency levels, with targeted opportunities for proficiency-based grouping
  • 20/20 Practice: Students in a few clusters of proficiency levels, with targeted opportunities for proficiency-based grouping
change

Personal Relationships and School Culture

11
Each student feels deeply known by an adult in the school.
Number of students who feel well known:
  • Level 1: Very few studentsr
  • Level 2: Some students
  • Level 3:Most students
  • 20/20 Practice: All students
change
12
In high-priority areas, low loads are used as a tool to support deep relationships between students and teachers.
In high-priority areas, teacher loads are:
  • Level 1: 100+ students
  • Level 2: Fewer than 100 students, but teachers do not build relationships with students
  • Level 3: 60–80 students, and teachers build relationships
  • 20/20 Practice: Fewer than 60 students, and teachers build relationships
change
13
Students feel connected with their school community on the basis of their personal interests and motivations.
Students feel personally connected to their school community:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Usually
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
14
Students have deep and respectful relationships with one another.
Deep and respectful student-student relationships exist:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes—relationships tend to be informal
  • Level 3: Usually—in many cases, high-quality formal structures support such relationships
  • 20/20 Practice: Always—high-quality formal structures systematically support such relationships
change
15
The school community (e.g., staff and families) broadly agrees on a shared vision and values.
Vision and values:
  • Level 1: Don’t exist, or exist in a very limited way
  • Level 2: Exist, but without strong buy-in
  • Level 3:Exist, and the majority of teachers and staff buy in
  • 20/20 Practice: Exist and are fully embraced by the whole school community
change
16
The school has consistent expectations for behavior and school-wide routines.
Expectations for behavior and routines are promoted through:
  • Level 1: Isolated systems in individual classrooms
  • Level 2: No school-wide systems, but some team-generated common systems
  • Level 3: Common, school-wide systems—however, implementation is inconsistent
  • 20/20 Practice: Common, school-wide systems with consistent implementation
change
17
Time and staff are allocated to develop, support, and reinforce school-wide vision, values, expectations, and routines.
Structures exist that dedicate time and staff (e.g., professional development, morning meeting, dean of culture, etc.):
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: In some cases
  • Level 3: Mostly, but not to fully meet needs
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
18
School vision, values, behavior expectations, and routines are clearly communicated to parents and families.
Vision, etc., is communicated to parents and families:
  • Level 1: Not at all
  • Level 2: Partially
  • Level 3: Mostly, but not fully embraced or understood
  • 20/20 Practice: Fully, and is broadly embraced and understood
change
19
Parents feel welcome at and participate in school.
Number of parents and families who feel welcome at and participate in school:
  • Level 1: Very few
  • Level 2: Some
  • Level 3: Most
  • 20/20 Practice: All
change

Targeted SEL

20
Teachers integrate core SEL competencies into academics.
Teachers give students explicit opportunities to exercise core SEL competencies in academic coursework:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Mostly
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
21
Relevant and timely data is used to identify students who require more intensive support.
Relevant data on SEL indicators is used to inform interventions:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Mostly
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
22
Relevant data on SEL indicators is made available at the appropriate frequency.
Relevant data on SEL indicators is made available at the appropriate frequency:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Mostly
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
23
Systems for providing more intensive support are in place, and they link students to outside providers where necessary. (Part 1 of 2)
Students who need more intensive SEL support are referred to external providers:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Too slowly- students’ needs typically intensify before accessing support
  • Level 3: Quickly enough for some students who require support but not others
  • 20/20 Practice: Quickly for all students who require support
change
24
Systems for providing more intensive support are in place, and they link students to outside providers where necessary. (Part 2 of 2)
A clear system to link students to external providers when necessary is:
  • Level 1: Nonexistent r
  • Level 2: Defined, but not used with fidelity
  • Level 3: Functional for most students
  • 20/20 Practice: Highly efficient, with clearly defined roles
change
25
A feedback loop exists between classroom teachers, external and school-based SEL support providers, and students' families. (Part 1 of 2)
A feedback loop between classroom teachers, external and school-based SEL support providers, and students’ families is implemented:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Mostly
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change
26
A feedback loop exists between classroom teachers, external and school-based SEL support providers, and students' families. (Part 2 of 2)
Classroom teachers work with external and school-based SEL experts on how to better support high-needs students:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: On an ad hoc basis
  • Level 3: Regularly, but not through a defined process
  • 20/20 Practice: Regularly, through a clear process with defined roles
change

Sufficient Time

27
Passing time, lunchtime, and other maintenance time is minimized to maximize time for instruction.
The percentage of the student day devoted to instruction is:
  • Level 1: Less than 75%
  • Level 2: 75–80%
  • Level 3: 81–90%
  • 20/20 Practice: Greater than 90%
change
28
Bell-to-bell instruction (quality instruction and engagement throughout class periods, with limited wasted time) occurs throughout the day.
Bell-to-bell instruction currently occurs in:
  • Level 1: Less than 25% of classrooms
  • Level 2: Between 25% and 50% of classrooms
  • Level 3: Between 50% and 75% of classrooms
  • 20/20 Practice: More than 75% of classrooms
change
29
Time within the current school day is fully scheduled for all students.
% of time unscheduled (study halls, free periods, early release):
  • Level 1: More than 20%
  • Level 2: Between 11% and 20%
  • Level 3: Between 5% and 10%
  • 20/20 Practice: Less than 5%
change
30
The number and length of periods within the master schedule are appropriately aligned with student learning needs and teacher capacity.
The number and length of periods are:
  • Level 1: Not aligned with student needs and teacher capacity
  • Level 2: Aligned in some areas only—not at all in high-priority areas
  • Level 3: Aligned in most areas, including high-priority areas
  • 20/20 Practice: Aligned in all areas
change
31
The allocation of instructional time reflects prioritization of core academics and highest-priority areas.
The percentage of instructional time devoted to core academics is:
  • Level 1: Less than 65%
  • Level 2: 65% or more, but equal time is spent across core areas
  • Level 3: 70–75%, with more time spent on high-priority areas (e.g., ELA double period)
  • 20/20 Practice: Greater than 75%, with more time spent on high-priority areas
change
32
The master schedule provides sufficient time for students to master core content.
Time provided is:
  • Level 1: Inadequate
  • Level 2: Adequate for a minority of students
  • Level 3: Adequate for a majority of students
  • 20/20 Practice: Adequate for all students
change
33
The master schedule provides sufficient time for students to master noncore, elective content.
Time provided is:
  • Level 1: Inadequate
  • Level 2: Adequate for a minority of students
  • Level 3: Adequate for a majority of students
  • 20/20 Practice: Adequate for all students
change
34
The master schedule provides sufficient time to address social/emotional goals.
Time provided is:
  • Level 1: Inadequate
  • Level 2: Adequate for a minority of students
  • Level 3: Adequate for a majority of students
  • 20/20 Practice: Adequate for all students
change
35
The standard school day is long enough for struggling students to catch up.
Compared to the national average (1,213 annual hours at elementary schools and 1,264 annual hours at secondary schools), struggling students have:
  • Level 1: Less than average time
  • Level 2: Up to 100 hours per year more than average
  • Level 3: Between 100 and 300 hours per year more than average
  • 20/20 Practice: At least 300 hours per year more than average
change
36
Any time provided to students outside of the typical school day is integrated and aligned with schools vision and instructional model.
Programs and partnerships for additional time are aligned:
  • Level 1: Rarely or never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Mostly
  • 20/20 Practice: Always
change

Cost Effectiveness through Creative Solutions

Your Score:
Assessment
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
20/20 Best Practice
Targeted Teacher Time
Community Partnerships
Creative Staffing Arrangements

Targeted Teacher Time

1
Non-instructional duties (e.g., lunch duty) are performed by lower-paid staff rather than by teachers.
This happens:
  • Level 1: Never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Frequently
  • 20/20 Practice: All the time
change
2
Where appropriate, lower-paid staff and/or technology are used to deliver portions of instruction or to reinforce prior learning, freeing teachers to work one on one or in small groups with target students.
This happens:
  • Level 1: Never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Frequently
  • 20/20 Practice: All the time
change

Community Partnerships

3
Your school partners with outside organizations for lower-cost, and as good or better quality services (e.g., enrichment, social-emotional health, food services, and cleaning).
School uses outside partnerships where they can provide higher quality and lower cost:
  • Level 1: Never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Frequently
  • 20/20 Practice: In all possible opportunities
change
4
Partnership goals and performance measures that align with specific school goals are formally agreed upon at the beginning of the relationship.
Agreed-upon goals are created:
  • Level 1: Never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Frequently
  • 20/20 Practice: In all possible opportunities
change
5
Partner staff is included in faculty team building and training to build an aligned and connected school community.
Partner staff is included:
  • Level 1: Never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Frequently
  • 20/20 Practice: For all possible opportunities
change
6
Regular meetings with partners occur to monitor service delivery and solve problems to ensure goals are being met.
Regular meetings happen:
  • Level 1: Not since the partnership began
  • Level 2: Sporadically
  • Level 3: Yearly
  • 20/20 Practice: Twice yearly
change
7
Other potential partner organizations, which deliver similar services as your existing partners, are considered to ensure school is getting the maximum value and quality.
Other potential partner organizations are considered:
  • Level 1: Not since the partnership began
  • Level 2: Sporadically
  • Level 3: Yearly
  • 20/20 Practice: Twice yearly
change

Creative Staffing Arrangements

8
Investment in classroom instruction is prioritized.
The percentage of total school personnel that provides instruction is:
  • Level 1: Less than 60%
  • Level 2: 60-70%
  • Level 3: 71-75%
  • 20/20 Practice: Greater than 75%
change
9
Deliberate and creative staffing arrangements (e.g., part-time staff, unique roles, distributed leadership, and/or staggered schedules) ensure services are provided at the lowest possible cost.
Creative staffing arrangements are deliberately used:
  • Level 1: Never
  • Level 2: Sometimes
  • Level 3: Frequently
  • 20/20 Practice: In all possible opportunities
change
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