Hiring

Leaders of high-performing schools and systems view hiring as a way to strategically improve teacher capacity and overall school performance.

What is the Challenge?

Every time a school leader has the opportunity to hire a new teacher, she should ideally take that opportunity to evaluate what skills the school, position, and teaching team require, what capabilities are missing on the faculty, and what kind of teacher could strengthen the school.

Districts typically spend very few recruiting dollars per teacher hired—and it shows in the quantity and quality of candidates. Spending wisely on recruiting and hiring is a good investment of resources, and is well worth the cost if the district ends up with the best possible teachers.

“If low-performing schools are not attracting the quality of teachers they need, the district must take action to support those schools in hiring, recruiting, and providing incentives to work in those schools.”

Step-By-Step Analysis

Download our worksheets to see how to evaluate your districts’ hiring process by analyzing:

  • Timing: The timing of recruitment and hiring is a critical factor in the quality of candidates. Districts that start the process too late are at a major disadvantage and lose the best candidates to other districts.
  • Stability of Teaching Force: Districts need to track the concentration of new teachers and the rate of teacher turnover by school. This information is key to improving the quality and consistency of teaching in each school.

Take Action

  • Develop a long-term staffing plan
  • Evaluate your teacher-recruiting and -hiring process, and your spending on it
  • Identify and expand effective sources of teaching candidates
  • Refine rules that force schools to accept teachers already in the system who are displaced from other schools
  • Increase principal flexibility and capacity around hiring
  • Carefully track teacher assignment to avoid overconcentration of new teachers in some schools and develop strategies to attract high-quality teachers to high-need schools